Fire Pits A Much Needed Patio Addition

October 18, 2016

By John Stoner

How many times have you looked at those spectacular stone or masonry fireplaces and thought how wonderful it would be to have one sitting at the end of your own patio? Then reality sets in and you realize the expense of adding such fireplace is prohibitive. Or maybe you just don’t have the space handle a large structure like that. Well all certainly is not lost. You still can have that outdoor fireplace that will fit any space and budget. The solution lies in one of the many types of fire pits or fire tables as they are often called.

The extremely popular chiminea was one of the first of this category to appear some years ago. Made of clay, cast iron or steel they are characterized by their large round fire chamber and tall thin chimney. They bring a piece of the old world charm to the patio or deck area. And now you have available many varieties of these smaller outdoor fire pits that can bring the warmth and ambiance of an outdoor fireplace at a fraction of the cost.

The fire pit can be permanently installed in your backyard, but the portable models available can meet almost any situation and budget requirement. Most will burn wood, natural gas or propane. Whether you choose a built in or portable fire pit they are much smaller, easier to install and far less expensive than an elaborate outdoor stone fireplace. Now if you chose to build one, be sure to use a fire pit kit. With these you can build up a brick or concrete enclosure that will be spectacular. These kits will include everything you need to get the job done right and without a lot hassle. If you don’t go the kit route, you can buy the needed components individually but you have to make sure they all work together. The major components needed include a frame, fire ring for dispersing the natural or propane gas, ignition system (match lit or electronic ignition) and log set. Do your research if you choose to go this route.

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There is an even more popular option and one that gives you more flexibility and versatility. That is the portable option. This is one of my favorites. They come in a variety of styles models and price ranges. Many are simply a metal fire bowel made of copper suitable for burning wood or charcoal. Equipped with a grill they are perfect for cookouts. Being portable they can go just about anywhere. Those family outings to the beach will never be the same.

If you want something a little more formal, there are many alternatives to choose from. Models come in many different designs. Some of my favorites are made from glass fiber reinforced concrete. The come in a wide variety of styles and models. Choose you preferred color such as grey, white, terracotta, etc. and you will have a spectacular addition to your patio. Another common material is granite. With the weight of granite these won’t be as portable so you want to decide where they are going to go ahead of time. Once in place they will be spectacular.

The fire pit is a perfect addition as our outdoor environments are transformed into truly outdoor entertainment centers. The fire pit is small enough to fit into anyone’s budget yet dramatic enough to be an outdoor focal point. If you have enough space, consider adding more than one. With variety of styles and functional designs, they can create vastly different settings around the patio.

What ever your particular needs are, the fire pit has become a very elegant and versatile way to add the charm and warmth of a cozy fire to your patio or outdoor living space. If you haven’t considered them, you really should. They will make your patio the envy of all your friends.

About the Author: John Stoner is the owner of

Patio Furniture, Fountains and Fireplaces

a website featuring decorating tips and ideas for the home, patio, deck and garden. Here you’ll find more information on

outdoor fire pits and fire tables



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OpenSync Interview – syncing on the free desktop

October 17, 2016

Friday, May 19, 2006

This interview intends to provide some insight into OpenSync, an upcoming free unified data synchronization solution for free software desktops such as KDE, commonly used as part of the GNU/Linux operating system.

Hi Cornelius, Armin and Tobias. As you are now getting close to version 1.0 of OpenSync, which is expected to become the new synchronisation framework for KDE and other free desktops, we are quite interested in the merits it can provide for KDE users and for developers, as well as for the Open Source Community as a whole. So there’s one key-question before I move deeper into the details of OpenSync:

What does OpenSync accomplish, that no one did before?


First of all it does its job of synchronizing data like addressbooks and calendars between desktop applications and mobile devices like PDAs and cell phones.
But the new thing about OpenSync is that it isn’t tied to a particular device or a specific platform. It provides an extensible and modular framework that is easy to adopt for application developers and people implementing support for syncing with mobile devices.
OpenSync is also independent of the desktop platform. It will be the common syncing backend for at least KDE and GNOME and other projects are likely to join. That means that the free desktop will have one common syncing solution. This is something really new.

How do the end-users profit from using synching solutions that interface with OpenSync as framework?


First, the users will be able to actually synchronize all their data. By using one common framework there won’t be any “missing links”, where one application can sync one set of devices and another application a different one. With OpenSync all applications can sync all devices.
Second, the users will get a consistent and common user interface for syncing across all applications and devices. This will be much simpler to use than the current incoherent collection of syncing programs you need if you have more than the very basic needs.

How does OpenSync help developers with coding?


It’s a very flexible and well-designed framework that makes it quite easy for developers to add support for new devices and new types of data. It’s also very easy to add support for OpenSync to applications.
The big achievement of OpenSync is that it hides all the gory details of syncing from the developers who work on applications and device support. That makes it possible for the developers to concentrate on their area of expertise without having to care what’s going on behind the scenes.
I have written quite a lot of synchronization code in the past. Trust me, it’s much better, if someone just takes care of it for you, and that’s what OpenSync does.


Another point to mention is the python wrapper for opensync, so you are not bound to C or C++, but can develop plugins in a high level scripting language.

Why should producers of portable devices get involved with your team?


OpenSync will be the one common syncing solution for the free desktop. That means there is a single point of contact for device manufacturers who want to add support for their devices. That’s much more feasible than addressing all the different applications and solutions we had before. With OpenSync it hopefully will become interesting for manufacturers to officially support Linux for their devices.

Do you also plan to support applications of OpenSync in proprietary systems like OSX and Windows?


OpenSync is designed to be cross-platform, so it is able to run on other systems like Windows. How well this works is always a question of people actually using and developing for this system. As far as I know there isn’t a real Windows community around OpenSync yet. But the technical foundation is there, so if there is somebody interested in working on a unified syncing solution on Windows, everybody is welcome to join the project.

What does your synchronisation framework do for KDE and for KitchenSync in particular?


OpenSync replaces the KDE-specific synchronization frameworks we had before. Even in KDE we had several separate syncing implementations and with OpenSync we can get replace them with a common framework. We had a more generic syncing solution in KDE under development. This was quite similar from a design point of view to OpenSync, but it never got to the level of maturity we would have needed, because of lack of resources. As OpenSync fills this gap we are happy to be able to remove our old code and now concentrate on our core business.

What was your personal reason for getting involved with OpenSync?


I wrote a lot of synchronization code in the past, which mainly came from the time where I was maintaining KOrganizer and working on KAddressBook. But this always was driven by necessity and not passion. I wanted to have all my calendar and contact data in one place, but my main objective was to work on the applications and user interfaces handling the data and not on the underlying code synchronizing the data.
So when the OpenSync project was created I was very interested. At GUADEC in Stuttgart I met with Armin, the maintainer of OpenSync, and we talked about integrating OpenSync with KDE. Everything seemed to fit together quite well, so at Linuxtag the same year we had another meeting with some more KDE people. In the end we agreed to go with OpenSync and a couple of weeks later we met again in Nuernberg for three days of hacking and created the KDE frontend for OpenSync. In retrospect it was a very pleasant and straightforward process to get where we are now.


My reason to get involved (or better to start) OpenSync was my involvement with its predecessor Multisync. I am working as a system administrator for a small consulting company and so I saw some problems when trying to find a synchronization solution for Linux.
At that point I joined the Multisync project to implement some plugins that I thought would be nice to have. After some time I became the maintainer of the project. But I was unhappy with some technical aspects of the project, especially the tight coupling between the syncing logic and the GUI, its dependencies on GNOME libraries and its lack of flexibility.


Well, I have been a KDE PIM developer for several years now, so there was no way around getting in touch with synchronization and KitchenSync. Although I liked the idea of KitchenSync, I hated the code and the user interface […]. So when we discussed to switch to OpenSync and reimplementing the user interface, I volunteered immediately.

Can you tell us a bit about your further plans and ideas?


The next thing will be the 1.0 release of OpenSync. We will release KitchenSync as frontend in parallel.


There are of course a lot of things on my todo and my wishlist for opensync. For the near future the most important step is the 1.0 release, of course, where we still have some missing features in OpenSync as well as in the plugins.
One thing I would really like to see is a thunderbird plugin for OpenSync. I use thunderbird personally and would really like to keep my contacts up to date with my cellular, but I was not yet able to find the time to implement it.


One thing that would really rock in future versions of OpenSync is an automatic hardware detection mechanism, so when you plugin your Palm or switch on your bluetooth device, OpenSync will create a synchronization group automatically and ask the user to start syncing. To bring OpenSync to the level of _The Syncing Solution [tm]_ we must reduce the necessary configuration to a minimum.

What was the most dire problem you had to face when creating OpenSync and how did you face it?


Fortunately the problems which I personally would consider to be dire are solved by the implementation of OpenSync which is well hidden from the outside world and [they are] an area I didn’t work on 😉


I guess that I am the right person to answer this question then 🙂
The most complicated part of OpenSync is definitely the format conversion, which is responsible for converting the format of one device to the format that another device understands.
There are a lot of subsystems in this format conversion that make it so complex, like conversion path searching, comparing items, detection of mime types and last but not least the conversion itself. So this was a hard piece of work.

What was the greatest moment for you?


I think the greatest moment was when, after three days of concentrated hacking, we had a first working version of the KDE frontend for OpenSync. This was at meeting at the SUSE offices in Nuernberg and we were able to successfully do a small presentation and demo to a group of interested SUSE people.


I don’t remember a distinct “greatest moment”. But what is a really great feeling is to see that a project catches on, that other people get involved, use the code you have written and improve it in ways that you haven’t thought of initially.


Hmm, also hacking on OpenSync/KitcheSync is much fun in general, the greatest moment was when the new KitchenSync frontend synced two directories via OpenSync the first time. But it was also cool when we managed to get the IrMC plugin working again after porting it to OpenSync.

As we now know the worst problem you faced and your greatest moment, the only one missing is: What was your weirdest experience while working on OpenSync?


Not directly related to OpenSync, but pretty weird was meeting a co-worker at the Amsterdam airport when returning from the last OpenSync meeting. I don’t know how high the chance is to meet somebody you know on a big random airport not related at all to the places where you or the other person live, but it was quite surprising.


Since my favorite language is C++, I was always confused how people can use plain C for such a project, half the time your are busy with writing code for allocating/freeing memory areas. Nevertheless Armin did a great job and he is always a help for solving strange C problems 🙂

Now I’d like to move on to some more specific questions about current and planned abilities of OpenSync. As first, I’ve got a personal one:

I have an old iPod sitting around here. Can I or will I be able to use a program utilizing OpenSync to synchronize my calendars, contacts and music to it?


I’m not aware of any iPod support for OpenSync up to now, but if it doesn’t exist yet, why not write it? OpenSync makes this easy. This is a chance for everybody with the personal desire to sync one device or another to get involved.


I dont think that there is iPod support yet for OpenSync. But it would definitely be possible to use OpenSync for this task. So if someone would like to implement an iPod plugin, I would be glad to help 🙂

Which other devices do you already support?


At this time, OpenSync supports Palms, SyncML and IrMC capable devices.

Which programs already implement OpenSync and where can we check back to find new additions?


On the application side there is support for Evolution [GNOME] and Kontact with KitchenSync [KDE] on the frontend side and the backend side and some more. I expect that further applications will adopt OpenSync once the 1.0 version is released.


Besides kitchensync there already are a command line tool and a port of the multisync GUI. Aside from the GUIs, I would really like to see OpenSync being used in other applications as well. One possibility for example would to be integrate OpenSync into Evolution to give users the possibility to synchronize their devices directly from this application. News can generally be found on the OpenSync web site

It is time to give the developers something to devour, too. I’ll keep this as a short twice-fold technical dive before coming to the takeoff question, even though I’m sure there’s information for a double-volume book on technical subleties.

As first dive: How did you integrate OpenSync in KitchenSync, viewed from the coding side?


OpenSync provides a C interface. We wrapped this with a small C++ library and put KitchenSync on top. Due to the object oriented nature of the OpenSync interfaces this was quite easy.
Recently I also started to write a D-Bus frontend for OpenSync. This also is a nice way to integrate OpenSync which provides a wide variety of options regarding programming languages and system configurations.

And for the second, deeper dive:

Can you give us a quick outline of those inner workings of OpenSync, from the developers view, which make OpenSync especially viable for application in several different desktop environments?


That’s really a question for Armin. For those who are interested I would recommend to have a look at the OpenSync website. There is a nice white paper about the internal structure and functionality of OpenSync.


OpenSync consists of several parts:
First there is the plugin API which defines what functions a plugin has to implement so that OpenSync can dlopen() it. There are 2 types of plugins:
A sync plugin which can synchronize a certain device or application and which provides functions for the initialization, handling the connection to a device and reading and writing items. Then there is a format plugin which defines a format and how to convert, compare and detect it.
The next part is a set of helper functions which are provided to ease to programming of synchronization plugins. These helper functions include things like handling plugin config files, HashTables which can be used to detect changes in sets of items, functions to detect when a resync of devices is necessary etc.
The syncing logic itself resides in the sync engine, which is a separate part. The sync engine is responsible for deciding when to call the connect function of a plugin, when to read or write from it. The engine also takes care of invoking the format conversion functions so that each plugin gets the items in its required format.
If you want more information and details about the inner workings of OpenSync, you should really visit the website or ask its developers.

To add some more spice for those of our readers, whose interest you just managed to spawn (or to skyrocket), please tell us where they can get more information on the OpenSync Framework, how they can best meet and help you and how they can help improving sync-support for KDE by helping OpenSync.


Again, the OpenSync web site is the right source for information. Regarding the KDE side, the mailing list is probably the right address. At the moment the most important help would be everything which gets the OpenSync 1.0 release done.
[And even though] I already said it, it can’t be repeated too often: OpenSync will be the one unified syncing solution for the free desktop. Cross-device, cross-platform, cross-desktop.
It’s the first time I feel well when thinking about syncing 😉.


Regarding OpenSync, the best places to ask would be the opensync mailing lists at sourceforge or the #opensync irc channel on the servers.
There are always a lot of things where we could need a helping hand and where we would be really glad to get some help. So everyone who is interested in OpenSync is welcome to join.

Many thanks for your time!


Thanks for doing the interview. It’s always fun to talk about OpenSync, because it’s really the right thing.


Thank you for taking your time and doing this interview. I really appreciate your help!


Thanks for your work. Publication and marketing is something that is really missing in the open source community. We have nice software but nobody knows 😉

Further Information on OpenSync can be found on the OpenSync Website:

This Interview was done by Arne Babenhauserheide in April 2006 via e-mail and KOffice on behalf of himself, the OpenSource Community, and the Dot ( It was first published on the Dot and is licensed under the cc-attribution-sharealike-license. A pdf-version with pictures can be found at opensync-interview.pdf (OpenDocument version: opensync-interview.odt)

This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

Study says to clean your sponge, microwave it

October 17, 2016

Thursday, January 25, 2007

Studies done on germs and bacteria performed by researchers at the University of Florida show that a dirty kitchen sponge can be cleaned and “sterilized” by microwaving it for 2 minutes, but researchers warn to wet the sponge first.

“People often put their sponges and scrubbers in the dishwasher, but if they really want to decontaminate them and not just clean them, they should use the microwave,” said the professor who was in charge of the study that discovered the results, Gabriel Bitton.

“Basically what we find is that we could knock out most bacteria in two minutes. The microwave is a very powerful and an inexpensive tool for sterilization,” added Bitton.

The sponges that researchers studied, were placed in “raw wastewater” and then put into a microwave to be “zapped,” according to Bitton. The wastewater was a “witch’s brew of fecal bacteria, viruses, protozoan parasites and bacterial spores, including Bacillus cereus spores,” said Bitton.

Researchers say that at least 99% of the bacteria, viruses, spores and parasites in kitchen spongees can be destroyed or “inactivated” by simply microwaving the wet sponge, on the highest power, for two minutes.

Implantable Silicone Lumen One Of The Obvious Benefits For Using Silicone Wire

September 20, 2016

Implantable silicone lumen One of the obvious benefits for using silicone wire



Silicone wire and cable is known for being extremely flexible and resistant to high temperatures, which makes it the material of choice in a variety of applications and industries that require an extremely flexible cable. Silicone wire is also flexible in the many applications and industries that it is used in. For example, Calmont is involved in a wide spectrum of projects using silicone wire and cable ranging from medical implants, automotive ignition wires to applications where the wire was weaved into fabric and even used for art and decorative lighting.

Industries that use silicone wire include:



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Robotics and automation


for wire and cable is the flexibility. Silicone wire, depending on the construction can be as limp as a piece of string. This type of wire is ideal with applications where routing a wire through a tight space is required such as, box builds, equipment, robotic arms or handheld devices. Other benefits include resistance to gasoline, alcohol-glycol. The temperature range for standard silicone is -60 C to 200 C and has excellent weather-ability. The downside to silicone is it\’s abrasion resistance which is fair. Depending on the application this may have no impact, best uses are static installations or when the wire or cable is not subject to contact with sharp objects.

Fluorosilicone is another type which is widely used and has a significantly greater chemical resistance than silicone. It is resistant to hydrocarbon fluids (gasoline / diesel) and solvents. The temperature range varies by the grade. Most is 250C it is available up to 350C upon request. Fluorosilicone also has excellent flexibility and flame retardant properties.

Tell your wire and cable manufacturer any special requirements your application has to get the right silicone compound. There are different grades, and durometers available. Sometimes a special formula or additive may be needed to meet the requirements listed below.

A few options include:

Medical grade

Flame retardant

Low smoke

High temperature to 350 C

Silicone ribbon cables are often used in place of PVC ribbon cables when flexibility is required. Silicone ribbon cables can be extruded or manufactured using a special process to bond the conductors. The construction of the silicone ribbon cable can be from two conductors to over twenty depending on the manufacturer\’s capabilities.

Calmont Wire and Cable manufactures custom wire and custom cable for medical, aerospace, military,robotics, computers, telecommunications and other precision applications requiring custom design

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‘Twin Towers’ warship set to enter New York

September 20, 2016

Tuesday, November 3, 2009

A warship built with steel from the World Trade Center is set to enter New York and travel up the Hudson River to the site of Ground Zero. 7.5 tons of steel from the buildings have been used in the construction of the USS New York. When the ship reaches Ground Zero it will fire a 21-gun salute. The ceremony will be viewed by relatives of those who lost their life during the September 11 attacks as well as rescuers and the public.

The official commissioning ceremony takes place on Saturday.

The crest of the ship features the images of the Twin Towers and the colours of the departments that first responded to the attacks.

The ship has 361 sailors serving aboard of which around 1 in 7 is from New York. A spokeswoman for the U.S Navy said that there had been many requests to serve on the ship.

The USS New York departed from Mississippi on October 14. This is the sixth ship to be named after the State of New York.

FIFA ethics committee recommends lifetime ban of former FIFA vice-president

September 20, 2016

Friday, May 6, 2016

The adjudicatory chamber of FIFA (International Federation of Association Football)’s independent ethics committee has opened up proceedings against former FIFA Vice-President Jeffrey Webb. In a statement released on Wednesday the ethics committee recommended Mr Webb receive a lifelong ban from all footballing activities for multiple violations of the articles of the FIFA Code of Ethics.

Mr Webb was indicted on corruption charges by the United States Department of Justice, and pled guilty in November to one count of racketeering conspiracy, three counts of wire fraud conspiracy and three of money laundering conspiracy. He is the former President of CONCACAF, the confederation for North America, Central America and Caribbean footballing associations, Vice-President of FIFA, and President of the Cayman Islands Football Association.

Mr Webb is to be given the opportunity to submit his position before a ruling by FIFA is handed down.

Chilean earthquakes: in pictures

September 20, 2016

Thursday, March 18, 2010

On the Feb. 27, Chile was hit by an magnitude 8.8 earthquake; almost 500 were killed, with resulting tsunami destroying most coastal towns between Llolleo and Araucanía Region. A second earthquake last week, with its epicentre in Pichilemu, caused destruction in the Coquimbo and Bío Bío regions.

A Wikinews contributor is in the area, and we look at the extent of this natural disaster’s damage through his photographs.

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People camping in La Cruz Hill, Pichilemu. They even constructed little houses, to make their stay more comfortable.Image: Diego Grez.

Church of Santa Cruz, after the February earthquake.Image: Diego Grez.

The Arturo Prat square before and after the earthquake and tsunami in Pichilemu.Image: Diego Grez.

Boat after tsunami in Pichilemu.Image: Diego Grez.

Military representatives in La Cruz Hill, Pichilemu, after the March earthquake.Image: Diego Grez.

On-scene soldiers on a truck, in Lolol, after the March earthquake.Image: Diego Grez.

Destroyed balaustrades and the ceiling of a kiosk over another balaustrades, near the beach of Pichilemu.Image: Diego Grez.

Lolol church after the March earthquake.Image: Diego Grez.

Many houses in Lolol were declared Historic Monuments of Chile. This is one of many that are going to be demolished.Image: Diego Grez.

Destroyed building Mirador by the tsunami in Pichilemu, and also by a kiosk/container.Image: Diego Grez.

Cars driving to La Cruz Hill in Pichilemu, a few hours after the disaster.Image: Diego Grez.

Chilean singer Joe Vasconcellos did a free solo tour in Chile after the Pichilemu and Maule earthquakes. Pictured during his performance in La Cruz Hill, Pichilemu.Image: Diego Grez.

House in front of the Main Beach of Pichilemu after the tsunami and earthquake combo.Image: Diego Grez.

Bucalemu was severely impacted by the February tsunami and earthquake; this picture taken after the March temblor.Image: Diego Grez.

Many houses were destroyed after the earthquake in Lolol, because they were old and made with rustic materials.Image: Diego Grez.

Another destroyed house, a few meters behind the Lolol church.Image: Diego Grez.

Pichilemu highway, the day of the earthquake and tsunami.Image: Diego Grez.

Most of the balustrades aroundRoss Park, in Pichilemu, were destroyed after the 2010 Pichilemu earthquake.Image: Diego Grez.

Destroyed kiosks after the tsunami in Pichilemu.Image: Diego Grez.

Just one kiosk and some bathrooms in front of the Arturo Prat Square survived the tsunami in Pichilemu.Image: Diego Grez.

The Cahuil Bridge was severely damaged after both quakes. It is broken in half and is a serious danger to motorists.Image: Diego Grez.

Several houses were destroyed in the town of Bucalemu, almost 40 kilometers from Pichilemu. In this picture, a house located in front of the beach was later thrown in the half of the roadway.Image: Diego Grez.

Cobquecura, the epicentre of the February quake.

The building Alto Río, in Concepción, collapsed after the February earthquake.Image: Claudio Núñez.

A severely damaged building in Maipú.Image: Jorge Barrios.

Collapsed Vespucio Norte Express Highway in Santiago, after the February earthquake.

The damaged Museum of Contemporary Art, after the February earthquake.

Aftermath of the February earthquake and tsunami in San Antonio.Image: Atilio Leandro.

Damaged Autopista del Maipo, near the city of Chada.Image: Lufke.

People trying to buy gasoline, in Chillán.Image: JOjo Jose Tomas.

Fire in the University of Concepción, after the February earthquake.

Destroyed houses in the Maule Region.Image: Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

Fire in a plastics factory, in Ruta 5 Norte.

Chillán‘s Medialuna after the February earthquake.

House in Pelluhue after the February temblor.Image: Caritas Linares.

US President Barack Obama holds a conference call from the White House Situation Room.

President Sebastián Piñera visits ONEMI after the February quake.Image: Sebastián Piñera E..

Zones affected by the February earthquake.Image: B1mbo.

Map of Chile showing the epicenter of the February quake.

USGS shake map of the February earthquake.

USGS intensity map of the March earthquake.

USGS intensity map for the most strong aftershock of the temblor.Image: USGS.

This article is a featured article. It is considered one of the best works of the Wikinews community. See Wikinews:Featured articles for more information.

Different Types Of Seating And Eating Arrangements}

September 20, 2016

Different Types of Seating and Eating Arrangements


Jordan Rocksmith

The dining room or the eating area of a home is really the center of the home. In about every culture, eating together is really where people bond, converse, and spend quality time together. In our busy society, it’s especially difficult to find time to slow down and get to know the people in our lives. Having a peaceful, well put-together area is one way that you can cultivate these relationships with the people in your family. Eating and cooking at home has also been linked to healthier relationships with food and better meal choices. Cooking at home can be a cheaper option than eating out and is less likely to fill you up with processed food. For all these reasons, setting up your ideal dining area with quality pieces from stores like Crowley furniture will give you a good environment and centered living experience.

The Traditional Dining Table and Chairs

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The oldies are sometimes the goodies. Traditional wooden tables and chairs will always be a staple for many people’s homes. There are also modern spin-offs of these types of furniture. You can find dining sets that are made out of stainless steel and recycled barn wood that are sealed with a polymer so that the wood doesn’t give people splinters. You can also get dining sets made out of plastic, glass, or almost any other material you can think of. You will want to choose one based on how many people you will generally be entertaining. If you frequently have parties, go for more seating. If it will only be your small family, it’s best to keep things close and intimate so that you can get the most out of your meals together.

Bar-Height Dining Sets

One of the more popular dining set types is currently the bar-height variety. The difference in these types is that they are usually raised a foot or two above the normal level. These look good in homes with vaulted ceilings or those that have lots of empty space. The extra height can be nice if you’re on the taller side and frequently bump your knees into conventional tabletops. You might want to avoid these tables if you have a small dining area, as they can make it look even more constrained. If you have small children, this type of set might not be the best for you because they can be difficult for shorter people to climb on and off of. For the college student or young professional couple, however, these are a trendy option that can make your dining area look good.

Why Install a Bar on Your Counter or Island

You may also forgo the table option altogether. More and more people, especially if they have limited space in their kitchen or dining area available, are choosing to incorporate eating areas into places that are also used as cooking surfaces. If you are always cooking alone in the kitchen, things can get lonely. If you have friends sitting at the bar helping or just watching, it can make the whole evening more fun. Bars are also great for sitting and chatting over cocktails. If you already have a bar area, you can create an overhang with your countertop by cutting away some of the lower-countertop material. Put in some higher stools or chairs and you’re ready to go!

If you have a lot of walking space in your kitchen, you can also put in an island and seating options from stores like Crowley furniture to create a more centrally located bar. This can be great seating and dining space in addition to the table and chairs you already have, as people can pull up a seat for breakfast and less formal dining occasions.

Dining Room Furniture sets by

Crowley Furniture

in Kansas City and Overland Park. Click here

to find more information!

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Different Types of Seating and Eating Arrangements


Steelers, Cardinals win championship games to advance to Super Bowl XLIII

September 20, 2016

Monday, January 19, 2009

The Pittsburgh Steelers and the Arizona Cardinals have won their respective conference championship games to advance to Super Bowl XLIII, the championship game of the National Football League. The game is scheduled to take place on February 1 in Tampa Bay at Raymond James Stadium. The Steelers were the American Football Conference champion, defeating the Baltimore Ravens by a score of 23 to 14. Meanwhile, the Cardinals became the National Football Conference champions by defeating the Philadelphia Eagles 32 to 25.

  1 2 3 4 Total
Baltimore Ravens 0 7 0 7 14
Pittsburgh Steelers 6 7 3 0 23

Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco was the first rookie quarterback in the history of the NFL to help lead his team to two straight playoff victories, defeating the number 3 seeded Miami Dolphins to win the Wild Card round, and the number 1 seeded Tennessee Titans in the divisional round. They came in to the game against a number 2 seeded Steelers team that had already defeated them twice during the regular season. Early in the game the Steelers defense dominated the field, forcing him to only complete 3 out of 14 pass attempts and end the half with a lowly 9.8 quarterback rating and his team losing 13 to 7. By the beginning of the second half, snow was beginning to fall. Early in the third quarter, Flacco threw a 16 yard pass to wide receiver Derrick Mason, only to be sacked by safety Troy Polamalu for an 8-yard loss on the next play, forcing a punt for the Ravens. The Steelers were held on their next possession, forcing another punt. After the Ravens got the ball back, Flacco led the team down the field in what ended as a 58-yard touchdown drive to put the team up 16 to 14. However, near the end of the game, Flacco threw an errant pass intended for Mason that was intercepted by Polamalu and returned for a 40-yard defensive touchdown. This made the score 23 to 14, and essentially knocked the Ravens out of the game.

With 3:19 remaining in the game and the Ravens in possession of the ball for one last chance, a passing play was called. Flacco dropped back into a throwing position, and threw a short pass to running back Willis McGahee, who caught the ball and turned upfield. Going full speed up the field, Steelers safety Ryan Clark collided with McGahee, also running at full speed. The two made helmet-to-helmet-contact, knocking both players to the ground and knocking the ball out of the hands of McGahee. Ray Rice, another running back, commented “It was tough to watch. He’s like a brother to me.” Clark was helped off of the field by the Steelers medical staff, but McGahee remained down on the field with movement in only his legs and arms. He told team doctors that he had significant pain in his neck, and was taken off the field on a cart and taken to a nearby hospital. It is unknown how severe the injuries are at this time.

After the game, Ravens coach John Harbaugh said in a statement “I’m not going to sit here and say Joe played a certain way. Joe went out there and competed and battled and fought and tried to find a way to win the football game. So I certainly have no complaints about that.” Flacco completed only 17 out of 30 pass attempts for 141 yards passing. He was also sacked 3 times and threw 3 interceptions. “I’m not blaming it on any rookie-wall stuff. I don’t believe in any of that stuff,” said Flacco.

  1 2 3 4 Total
Philadelphia Eagles 3 3 13 6 25
Arizona Cardinals 7 17 0 0 32

In the NFC championship, the Arizona Cardinals had not made it to a Super Bowl in the past 60 years. They were matched up against the high-powered offense of the Philadelphia Eagles, who were the number 6 seed in the NFC. The Cardinals were the number 4 seed, defeating the number 5 seeded Atlanta Falcons on Wild Card weekend, and the number 2 seeded Carolina Panthers in the NFC Divisional playoff round. The Cardinals were led by quarterback Kurt Warner, who became the second quarterback in NFL history to lead two different teams to a Super Bowl, the other being the St. Louis Rams. During the first half, the Cardinals quickly took the lead. By halftime, their lead was extended to 18 points in what looked like an easy win for the team. However, in the third quarter, Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb threw three touchdown passes, two of them being to tight end Brent Celek. After kicker David Akers missed an extra point attempt after the third touchdown pass, the score was 25 to 24 in favor of the Eagles. After the Cardinals received the ball, they drove up the field. With just under 3 minutes remaining in the game, Kurt Warner completed a game-winning touchdown pass to running back Tim Hightower, making the score 32 to 25,. and sealing the game for the Cardinals.

Kurt Warner completed 21 passes out of 28 pass attempts, for a total of 279 passing yards. Wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald caught three touchdown passes of 9, 62, and 1 yard, building on his record-breaking playoff performance of 23 catches, 419 yards, and 5 receiving touchdowns over 3 games. “It really set in when I saw the confetti. I always dreamed of being in the confetti. This is beyond my wildest dreams,” said Cardinals linebacker Bertrand Berry after the game. On the other side, Donovan McNabb remarked on not making it to the Super Bowl again. “You never want anything to end. It’s tough when you’re that close to making it to the Super Bowl,” he commented.

May Day march takes place in London

September 20, 2016

Monday, May 1, 2006

Workers and trade union members have taken part in the traditional May Day march in London, ending in a rally at Trafalger Square. TUC leader Brendan Barber addressed the crowd, praising the labour movement and expressing solidarity with the workers of the Peugeot manufacturing plant in Coventry, who face redundancy.

An estimated 40,000 people took part.